Sunday, July 21, 2013

Ready For Football: Cornhole Set... With Update..

I had been yammering on and on about the Adirondack project so much to ne of my friends at work, he hinted that I might consider another fun project to keep from getting bored with it.  Of course, on Friday, I spent the entire day cutting the boards for another set of chairs, but on Saturday and Sunday, my son and son-in-law helped me with a project to build not one, but two sets of cornhole boards.

Okay, so for those not familiar with this popular tailgating game, the gist of it is, horse shoes, but instead of tossing horse shoes at stakes, you toss bean bags at boards with a hole in it.  Need more detail than that, try this web page where I downloaded a complete guide for building the cornhole set.

First off, let me say that this little project was actually more expensive than building a pair of Adirondack chairs.  Also, it looks so very simple, and in terms of skills needed, it is a very basic project, but the three of us spent quite a bit of time cutting, sanding and painting, and after two days, it isn't completely finished.  Having said that, I think this is something that we will appreciate for years to come.  I'm certain anytime we have a family outing, we'll play a little cornhole, and of course, I can just imagine any sporting events where we feel the need to bust out the big screen outside, we'll do some cornholing.

Also, my wife has said the word "Cornholio" at least 50 times this weekend, since that is an official term in the game. 
So for two complete sets, we started off with a really well sanded 4 X 8 sheet of quality 1/2 inch plywood, cut into for 24" X 48" sections.
We also cut 2 X 4's to create a frame, and legs for the boards.
One of the slow parts was the cutting of the hole in the board.  Here's the deal; if you screw this up, you just wasted a fairly expensive piece of wood.  I know, your main question is, why is there a plastic flower on our lumber?  Multiple projects at once.
After building the frames, the next step was to mount the boards to the frames.  We used glue, then a bunch of screws.  What isn't obvious from the picture is the fact that we had to countersink the screws so we could use wood filler to make the playing surface completely smooth.
 The front legs had to be mounted to the boards, and each of the legs had to be measured and cut to size.  In reality, this was the one area where the instructions took us down a different, and I submit, rockier path than if I had just figured it out on my own.  You can see how the leg is rounded.  This allows you to fold the leg flat for storage.  Great idea.
But the method they described for measuring everything left us all thinking it was wrong.  And in fact, in the end, I don't think any of our legs were exactly the same.
As Taz and I assembled them, Tyler worked the wood filler magic.
From there, lots of sanding ensued.
And then we had to put on a good coat or two of primer.  Seriously, the painting was the most expensive and time consuming part of the project.
With the primer dry, we got started with our colors.  Our theme is UTSA Roadrunners.  There are some people who suggest making the boards opposing colors, but we liked the idea of making them the same, orange back ground with blue trim.
 With the background dry, we started on the blue sides.  This was about as far as we could get on Saturday.
On Sunday, we continued the boarder on the playing surface just to spiff it up. and then, we had the issue of painting an outline around the hole.

After lots of contemplation, I took a Frisbee we bought for Gracie and cut it into a ring I could paint through.  I have no idea why the board looks yellow, but it just does.

After some sketchy moments of painting, it looks reasonably okay.  We plan to let it all dry overnight, then do some sanding to get any imperfections out of the surface.
We also ordered some custom UTSA Roadrunner Logos from ZGrafix in Devine.  We'll get them on Tuesday and can apply them.  I think having the large Roadrunner logo centered in the middle will really add to it.

From there, we'll do a coat of Minwax Polycrylic to cover the whole surface and make it nice, smooth and shiny.  Or we may use a spray automotive clearcoat.  Still haven't decided.  I'll post a final picture when we wrap it up and start tossing cornholios!

UPDATE: We got the UTSA Roadrunner logos and applied them followed by seven coats of the Minwax PolyCrylic product.  
I was worried that it seemed to go on very thin, but after one sanding and a final few coats, the surface is fantastic.   This was an expensive project but the results were well worth the cost and the hard work. 

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

You are quite the craftsman!
Noreen

Keith Alan K said...

Those look great! Can't wait to see them with the logos. Only project I have to look forward to is fixing a leaning privacy fence....no comfort or fun to be had.

AlanDP said...

A pink compass?

Dave said...

A pink compass?

Hey, I have to work with what I have - or in this case, what Eva has with her school supplies.

It does make me feel rather pretty, though.

Anonymous said...

Those boards look CLEAN. Would you consider making more to sell? I cant find any UTSA boards online to buy.

Dave said...

I cant find any UTSA boards online to buy.

E-mail me and I'll see if I can help.